Ty Cobb

American baseball player Ty Cobb

Tyrus Raymond "Ty" Cobb, nicknamed "The Georgia Peach," was an American Major League Baseball outfielder. He was born in Narrows, Georgia. Cobb spent 22 seasons with the Detroit Tigers, the last six as the team's player-manager, and finished his career with the Philadelphia Athletics. In 1936, Cobb received the most votes of any player on the inaugural Baseball Hall of Fame ballot, receiving 222 out of a possible 226 votes.
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Biography
Ty Cobb's personal information overview.
Deceased
17 July 1961
Death Place
Atlanta, Georgia

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News
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Time to review an old baseball strategy - The Augusta Chronicle
Google News - over 6 years
For that answer, we have to consider the way the game was played in the days of former Augustan Ty Cobb. He often referred to it as “scientific” baseball, a game in which home runs were rare and batters and base runners advanced base to base to base
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'Home of the Stars' turns 100 - Allentown Morning Call
Google News - over 6 years
This year, the structure that allowed fairgoers to see Ty Cobb play baseball, Lucky Teter perform death-defying stunts and Lawrence Welk utter "wunnerful, wunnerful" turns 100 years old. The grandstand cost $96000 — $2.2 million in today's dollars
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The Knife in Ty Cobb's Back - Smithsonian (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Al Stump, commissioned in 1960 to ghostwrite Ty Cobb's autobiography, My Life in Baseball: The True Record, would say it was a boozy, pill-induced, off-the-record confession—a secret revealed by the Detroit Tigers great as he spent the last painful
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Witherspoon added to AC card - fightnews.com
Google News - over 6 years
Just added to the card is Philadelphia's heavyweight contender, Chazz Witherspoon (28-2, 20 KOs) who is set to square off against Ty Cobb (14-2, 8 KOs). Witherspoon, the 2004 National Golden Gloves Champion, is looking to put himself back into the
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Johnny Unitas' Connection to Ty Cobb - Washington Times (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
So much so that I'm just getting around to “Johnny U,” Tom Callahan's elegant biography of Baltimore Colts legend Johnny Unitas, and “Cobb,” Al Stump's classic rendering of the life and times of baseball great Ty Cobb. Needless to say, I was blown away
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Fan's view: Baseball movies Hollywood should film - Yahoo! Sports
Google News - over 6 years
Contributor Network Aug 10, 6:07 pm EDT From Tommy Lee Jones' portrayal of Ty Cobb to Kevin Costner in "Field of Dreams," many of Hollywood's most memorable moments have centered on the sport. Ernie: Based on the life of Detroit Tigers Hall-of-Fame
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Commentary by Guy W. Farmer: Illegal immigrants and drug trade a scourge - Nevada Appeal
Google News - over 6 years
Not long ago my friend and fellow columnist Ty Cobb, Sr. pointed out that dangerous California-based Latino street gangs affiliated with Mexican drug cartels are now active in the Silver State. These ultra-violent cartels smuggle illegal immigrants
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New hospital on time, under budget - Franklin County Citizen News Leader
Google News - over 6 years
Construction of the new Ty Cobb Regional Medical Center is on time and under budget. And when it opens as scheduled in the spring of 2012, it will instantly be a major economic force, developers of the project told the Lavonia Housing
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Ty Cobb's Twin Falls Ties - Twin Falls Times-News
Google News - over 6 years
This month marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Ty Cobb, the irascible Detroit Tigers right-fielder who was the first player voted into baseball's Hall of
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ESPN features Ty Cobb and his Detroit home (which still stands) - Detroit Free Press
Google News - over 6 years
Ty Cobb / AP BY KIRKLAND CRAWFORD One of the homes of baseball's first offensive superstar still stands in Detroit. The story behind the woman who lives there now is worth a read. Ty Cobb, the all-time leader in career batting average,
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Sansevere: Blyleven's wait was way too long - FS North
Google News - over 6 years
Not Ty Cobb. Nobody. There are voters who turn in empty ballots. Voters who are self-anointed keepers of the Hall. Voters who punish deserving people, like Bert Blyleven. I had one of the more than 500 votes cast in Hall of Fame balloting this year
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Catch some old Ty Cobb footage and more from the Baseball Hall Of Fame Aug. 5 - A.V. Club Chicago
Google News - over 6 years
... pm The event will be hosted by David Filipi of the Wexner Center in Columbus, Ohio, who will treat baseball fans to very old movies from the Baseball Hall Of Fame of some of the game's most influential players, such as Jackie Robinson and Ty Cobb
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ty Cobb
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 1961
    Age 74
    Some historians, including Wesley Fricks, Dan Holmes, and Charles Leerhsen have defended Cobb against unfair portrayals of him in popular culture since his death. A noted case is the book written by sportswriter Al Stump in the months after Cobb died in 1961.
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    He checked into Emory Hospital for the last time in June 1961.
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  • 1959
    Age 72
    In December 1959, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, and Bright's disease.
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  • 1956
    Age 69
    He knew that another way he could share his wealth was by having biographies written that would both set the record straight on him and teach young players how to play. John McCallum spent some time with Cobb to write a combination how-to and biography titled The Tiger Wore Spikes: An Informal Biography of Ty Cobb that was published in 1956.
  • 1955
    Age 68
    At age 20, he was the youngest player to win a batting championship and held this record until 1955, when fellow Detroit Tiger Al Kaline won the batting title twelve days younger than Cobb when he did it.
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  • 1949
    Age 62
    At 62, Cobb married a second time in 1949. His new wife was 40-year-old Frances Fairbairn Cass, a divorcee from Buffalo, New York. Their childless marriage also failed, ending with a divorce in 1956.
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  • 1947
    Age 60
    At the 1947 Old-Timers' Day game in Yankee Stadium, he warned catcher Benny Bengough to move back, claiming he was rusty and hadn't swung a bat in almost 20 years.
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    The couple eventually divorced in 1947 after 39 years of marriage; the last few of years of which Mrs. Cobb lived in nearby Menlo Park.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1941
    Age 54
    Cobb's competitive fires continued to burn after retirement. In 1941, he faced Babe Ruth in a series of charity golf matches at courses outside New York, Boston and Detroit and won two out of three.
  • FORTIES
  • 1936
    Age 49
    In February 1936, when the first Hall of Fame election results were announced, Cobb had been named on 222 of 226 ballots, outdistancing Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson and Walter Johnson, the only others to earn the necessary 75% of votes to be elected that first year.
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  • 1930
    Age 43
    Tyrus Raymond, Jr. then entered Yale University and became captain of the tennis team while improving his academics, but was then arrested twice in 1930 for drunkenness and left Yale without graduating.
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    In the winter of 1930, Cobb moved into a Spanish ranch estate on Spencer Lane in the millionaires' community of Atherton outside San Francisco, California.
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  • 1928
    Age 41
    Cobb returned for the 1928 season, but played less frequently due to his age and the blossoming abilities of the young A's, who were again in a pennant race with the Yankees.
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  • 1927
    Age 40
    Cobb played regularly in 1927 for a young and talented team that finished second to one of the greatest teams of all time, the 110–44 1927 Yankees, returning to Detroit to a tumultuous welcome on May 11 and doubling his time up to the cheers of Tiger fans.
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    Speaker signed with the Washington Senators for 1927, and Cobb with the Philadelphia Athletics.
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    On January 27, 1927, Judge Landis cleared Cobb and Speaker of any wrongdoing because of Leonard's refusal to appear at the hearings.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1926
    Age 39
    Cobb announced his retirement after a 22-year career as a Tiger in November 1926, and headed home to Augusta, Georgia.
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  • 1925
    Age 38
    At the end of 1925 Cobb was once again embroiled in a batting title race, this time with one of his teammates and players, Harry Heilmann.
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    All of these men were assigned to the Gas and Flame Division, where they trained soldiers in preparation for chemical attacks by exposing them to gas chambers in a controlled environment, which was eventually responsible for Mathewson's contracting tuberculosis which led to his premature death on the eve of the 1925 World Series.
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  • 1924
    Age 37
    On May 10, 1924, Cobb was honored at ceremonies before a game in Washington, D.C., by more than 100 dignitaries and legislators.
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  • 1922
    Age 35
    In 1922, Cobb tied a batting record set by Wee Willie Keeler, with four five-hit games in a season.
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  • 1920
    Age 33
    By 1920, Babe Ruth, newly sold to the newly named New York Yankees from the Boston Red Sox, had established himself as a power hitter, something Cobb was not considered to be.
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  • 1919
    Age 32
    Leonard accused former pitcher and outfielder Smoky Joe Wood and Cobb of betting on a Tiger-Indian game played in Detroit on September 25, 1919, in which they allegedly orchestrated a Tiger victory to win the bet.
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  • 1918
    Age 31
    In October 1918, Cobb enlisted in the Chemical Corps branch of the United States Army and was sent to the Allied Expeditionary Forces headquarters in Chaumont, France.
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  • 1917
    Age 30
    In 1917, Cobb hit in 35 consecutive games, still the only player with two 35-game hitting streaks (including his 40-game streak in 1911).
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1915
    Age 28
    In 1915, Cobb set the single-season record for stolen bases with 96, which stood until Dodger Maury Wills broke it in 1962.
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  • 1912
    Age 25
    On May 15, 1912, Cobb assaulted a heckler, Claude Lucker (often misspelled as Lueker), in the stands in New York's Hilltop Park where his Tigers were playing the Highlanders (now the Yankees).
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  • 1911
    Age 24
    On May 12, 1911, Cobb's play illustrated his combination of skill and cunning.
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    Cobb was having a tremendous year in 1911, which included a 40-game hitting streak.
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  • 1910
    Age 23
    Going into the final days of the 1910 season, Cobb had a .004 lead on Nap Lajoie for the American League batting title.
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  • 1908
    Age 21
    In August 1908, Cobb married Charlotte ("Charlie") Marion Lombard, the daughter of prominent Augustan Roswell Lombard.
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    In 1908, Cobb attacked a black laborer in Detroit who complained when Cobb stepped into freshly poured asphalt; Cobb was found guilty of battery but the sentence was suspended.
  • 1907
    Age 20
    In the offseason between 1907 and 1908, Cobb negotiated with Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina, offering to coach baseball there "for $250 a month, provided that he did not sign with Detroit that season."
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    In September 1907, Cobb began a relationship with The Coca-Cola Company that lasted the remainder of his life.
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    Despite great success on the field, Cobb was no stranger to controversy off it. As described in Smithsonian Magazine, "In 1907 during spring training in Augusta, Georgia, a black groundskeeper named Bungy Cummings, whom Cobb had known for years, attempted to shake Cobb's hand or pat him on the shoulder."
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    He finished the 1907 season with a league-leading .350 batting average, 212 hits, 49 steals and 119 runs batted in (RBI).
    In 1907, Cobb reached first and then stole second, third and home.
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    After being moved to right field, he led the Tigers to three consecutive American League pennants in 1907, 1908 & 1909.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1906
    Age 19
    The following year, 1906, Cobb became the Tigers' full-time center fielder and hit .316 in 98 games, setting a record for the highest batting average (minimum 310 plate appearances) for a 19-year-old (later bested by Mel Ott's .322 average in 124 games for the 1928 New York Giants).
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    Although he hit .240 in 41 games, he signed a lucrative $1,500 contract from the Tigers for 1906.
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  • 1905
    Age 18
    Three weeks after his mother killed his father, Cobb debuted in center field for the Detroit Tigers. On August 30, 1905, in his first major league at bat, he doubled off of Jack Chesbro of the New York Highlanders.
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    On August 8, 1905, Cobb's mother fatally shot his father with a pistol that his father had purchased for her.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1886
    Born
    Cobb was born in 1886 in Narrows, Georgia, a small rural community of farmers that was not an official city or village at the time.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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